All You Ever Need To Know About Eating Roadkill

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All You Ever Need To Know About Eating Roadkill - Here are some animals that are considered "safe" to eat: Badger, hedgehog, otter, rabbit, pheasant, fox, beaver, squirrel, deer (venison), moose, bear, raccoon, opossum, kangaroo, wallaby, possum, rabbit, etc. Rats that are roadkill I would give a wide berth. You will find out why in the original article. EWW.

Meat is going to look very different when you are starving. This idea of pristine meat that is sitting in a refrigerated environment will go away in an SHTF situation. For most of human history, meat has been a luxury and a scarcity. 

Roadkill is a touchy subject for some people but for preppers, survivalists, and homesteaders road kill could be a great source of meat for their diets.

Roadkill has been here ever since the horse and cart and probably been around longer than that, I wonder if the Romans used to run wild animals over back in the day?

Most of us see roadkill pretty much on a daily basis. I have thought about researching into eating roadkill because I know that meat isn’t getting cheaper and if you know its fresh, why wouldn’t you want to have some free meat? even if you don’t know it’s fresh, there are ways to determine if it’s safe to eat.

What Can You Eat? 

Here are some animals that are considered “safe” to eat: Badger, hedgehog, otter, rabbit, pheasant, fox, beaver, squirrel, deer (venison), moose, bear, raccoon, opossum, kangaroo, wallaby, possum, rabbit, etc. Rats that are roadkill I would give a wide berth. 

Any fowl odors or bloating means that the animal has been dead too long and you want to avoid it. 

Eating animals that have been dead for too long means the meat will be tainted. Effectively, the digestive tract will have burst and the meat will be ruined. 

Roadkill on warm days has a shorter “shelf life” than animals killed on a cold day. This should be common sense but its worth considering.

Cooking Roadkill

Unless the meat is very fresh you should look to cook all the roadkill to an internal temperature of 165 degrees. This is a bacteria and pathogen killing temperature that makes most meat safe. 

All You Ever Need To Know About Eating Roadkill - Here are some animals that are considered "safe" to eat: Badger, hedgehog, otter, rabbit, pheasant, fox, beaver, squirrel, deer (venison), moose, bear, raccoon, opossum, kangaroo, wallaby, possum, rabbit, etc. Rats that are roadkill I would give a wide berth. You will find out why in the original article. EWW.

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