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BUSTED: 5 Homesteading Myths that Aren’t True

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Thinking about engaging in homesteading? That is a great idea. The personal satisfaction, the money-saving potential, and the bonding it can foster with your family are all well worth it. However, if you are going to think about homesteading, there are myths that you need to look out for.

With that in mind, read on for five homesteading misconceptions and myths.

5 Homesteading Myths:

1. It’s all or Nothing

Many people think that to be a homesteader, they need to go completely off the grid. Nope! The truth is that the qualifications for homesteading are very loose. No one is out there to police what you do. You don’t lose your homesteading street cred by having the occasional dependencies.

The point is personal freedom. Be true to your own standards, and you won’t run into any problems.

2. The Point is to Relax

Many people also believe that the point of homesteading is to relax more. While homesteading does have therapeutic value, it is also very challenging.

Growing your own food, raising animals, and producing textiles are all tough jobs. Not at all comparable to a week at the beach.

If you go into homesteading, you will be busy all of the time. The work is meaningful, but it is backbreaking.

Don’t go into the process expecting it to be a vacation. You’ll probably find yourself spending a lot of your time at your router table or your garden.

3. You Need to be a Farmer

Don’t get me wrong. A background in farming is definitely going to be helpful on the homestead. The skills transfer over quite naturally.

However, many thousands of people have taken to homesteading all across the country. They don’t all have a background in farming.

The thing that they do share? Willpower. Determination.

If you can embody these qualities, you can homestead. Read books. Consult the web. Utilize the community. You will figure things out.

4. You Can’t Have a Job if You Homestead

Don’t misunderstand: Homesteading is definitely its own job. If you make the decision to go into it, do so knowing that the time commitment will be significant.

Does that mean that you can’t also hold down a full-time job? No, it just means that you will need to utilize tools and other resources.

Automatic watering systems are a great way to let your garden take care of itself. And you can also hire out for daytime care of your animals if need be. Of course, these things are pricey, but if you want the best of both worlds, you need to compromise.

5. Homesteaders are Hippies, Weirdos, Doomsayers, etc.

Let’s be honest. There is sometimes a stigma surrounding the homesteading movement. Many people think that all homesteaders are in some way peculiar.

Like every group, there are strange people in the homestead movement. However, they certainly do not make up the majority.

Homesteaders are hardworking and committed to living a peaceful, quiet lifestyle. If you fall into that category, then you will probably appreciate the lifestyle.

P.S. Have you ever thought about putting a supermarket in your back yard?

This is exactly what our great-grandparents used to do every single day. This can save you money on food, treats, reconditioned clothes, tools, and even furniture.

This is as self-reliant as it gets, so watch this eye-opening video to learn more.

Have you ever thought about putting a supermarket in your back yard


Bonus: Root Cellar That Can Be Used as a Bunker

root cellar that can be used as a bunker

Do you remember the old root cellars our great-grandparents used to have? In fact, they probably built it themselves, right in their back yard.

If you want to learn how to build a backyard bunker like your grandparents had, without breaking the bank, then you need Easy Cellar.

Easy Cellar will show you:

  • How to choose the ideal site
  • Cost-effective building methods
  • How to protect your bunker from nuclear blast and fallout
  • How to conceal your bunker
  • Affordable basic life support options

Easy Cellar will also reveal how a veteran, with only $421, built a small nuclear bunker in his backyard.

Also included:

DIY Reloading Bench: Beginners Guide
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