How To Make Bannock Or Indian Bread, The Food Of Mountain Men

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How To Make Bannock Or Indian Bread, The Food Of Mountain Men - To put it in a few words, bannock is a round, heavy and unleavened bread. Most mountain men call it a flat cake.

Back in the day, people were struggling to survive and every day was a challenge. Foods with a high-calorie intake were in high demand and taste wasn’t as important as it is today. People were looking for calories and durability, and they couldn’t afford to be picky. Bannock or Indian bread is one of the foods that stood the test of time, and it’s made even today on the trail.

In the 18th century, many families relied on bannock because they were able to keep it in all weather. One major advantage is that Indian bread could stay fresh for long periods of time. In fact, bannock was an important staple food on the Oregon Trail.

Nowadays, bannock is in the same survival food league as pemmican, jerky, and hardtack. The type of foods that can keep you alive, no matter the crisis you find yourself in.

What is bannock?

To put it in a few words, bannock is a round, heavy and unleavened bread. Most mountain men call it a flat cake. It is the closest thing to bread they had back then, and it was easy to make on the trail. When a round bannock is cut into wedges, the wedges are often called scones.

Bannock is also known as Indian bread, and it can be found throughout North American Native cuisine. Even the Inuit of Canada and Alaska are making bannock, and this bread recipe can be found in the culture of other Alaska Natives as well.

Read more about how to make bannock here:

How To Make Bannock Or Indian Bread, The Food Of Mountain Men

How To Make Bannock Or Indian Bread, The Food Of Mountain Men - To put it in a few words, bannock is a round, heavy and unleavened bread. Most mountain men call it a flat cake.


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